Thursday, March 23, 2017

Whitescapes

The first photo is a small shampoo bottle with a white background with the natural inside light. It has almost a yellowish dull undertone. The second photo is with a light on it. It looks much brighter with blue hues and much more visible white.

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Escaping Flatland

This article was very confusing and hard to dive into to understand the authors purpose. What I took from the article was that the dimensions are extremely important from the artist to the viewer. Making art 2-dimmensional allows for more in depth perceptions art. The photo attached to the article is very scaled out and is almost like a map to what the artist wanted us to see. Also, when a piece of art is photographed then seen through a computer screen, mainly how we always view art, it is not authentic and we cannot see the exact art because it is shown to us through pixels rather than brushstrokes for example. The article mentions Galileo, and it reminds me back to when I took Intro to the Universe last semester. While the article still leaves me questioning I connect this with the in class discussion of color, particularly the blue color of the sky. Many people see variations of color which I agree with, however, in Universe class the question, "Why is the Sky blue?" was on every single test. It has a scientific answer simply that the sun reflects more blue particles than it does red. Therefore, the sky is blue.

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Ways of Seeing

John Berger's text "Ways of Seeing" was at first a very confusing story for me to grasp. I tried to think about it through my own sight looking at a painting for the very first time. Even though it is my first time viewing a painting millions of people could have seen it before in a different way. This also leads into recreations of paintings. I connected it with old folk tale stories that were handed down by mouth. Each time the story is retold it may change a little. That could be the same in repainting a famous photo. This connects with the concept art changing over time. It is extremely interesting to me that art can be made in a certain time for a certain purpose, and 100 years later it could be use to describe something else: using knowledge to interpret what we see.

Monday, January 30, 2017

BMA- Andy Warhol Self- Portrait

Going to the art museum last week was a very fun activity in place of class. One piece of artwork that I thought was very interesting was "Self-Portrait" by Andy Warhol. It is a synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas. It was in the modern art section on the museum and was a huge display. It's black backdrop with pink marks almost looked smudged and chalked on. To me it also looked like he was wearing some type of head dress on or feathers. The portrait is perceived to be of Andy Warhol himself, but an "elusive" portrait because viewers can exactly tell details of him. Warhol made many self-portraits throughout his career, however this one is subject to the real or true representation of him and is a more aged version. 

Andy Warhol's Portrait:


Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Visibility by Italo Calvino

While some of Italo Calvino's ideas needed more thought in "Visibility" an idea that stuck out to me easily was that imagination is a way of attaining knowledge outside the individual. Imagination opens many different outlets for the human being. Visibility creates the difference between the two types of the imaginative process. The first being at the word which arrives at the visual image, example: writing, reading, and directing. The second type starts with the visual image and arrives at its verbal expression. The second can be when viewing a piece of art and it then connects with a word in your mind to give meaning. I think many people can relate to the first type of imagination. It is very common for people to think out something on paper, organize it, plan it and then perform it out.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

The Whole Ball of Wax - Review

"The Whole Ball of Wax" by Jerry Saltz begins itself in the form of a question, "Can art change the world?" Salt answers this question soon after with a definite no, but continues on to pose many other questions on the power of art. When I read the first paragraph I agreed that no, maybe art can not stop the spread of AIDS, but I believe that seeing some piece of art, no matter what it is, can change a person's views or ideas in a second. This idea connects to the "bridge" of art to a "new vision and the vision itself". Art is the same as religion, politics, or science in that it is an experience. Looking into a piece of art for more than just how it appears. I agree with Saltz that art is an experience, where you see it, with whom, how does it make you feel, how was it made, etc. I think that everyone has much different experiences and opinions therefore, art can not have a singular result or meaning. Another part to point out is that art tells us things we didn't know: things about ourselves, and maybe things we didn't even care to know. After reading this article I am now more aware of art and what it does for the human mind, body, environment, and society.